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Study of the Translation Strategies for the Chinese Culture-loaded Words in Peking Opera under Functional Equivalence Theory

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DOI: 10.23977/abroa.2022.020103 | Downloads: 3 | Views: 385

Author(s)

Manying Li 1

Affiliation(s)

1 School of International Study, Communication University of China, Beijing, China

Corresponding Author

Manying Li

ABSTRACT

As China's “quintessence”, Peking Opera has become an important channel for foreign people to understand Chinese culture. One of the characteristics of Peking Opera is that its librettos contain a wealth of culture-loaded words. Based on this, under the guidance of Eugene Nida's functional equivalence theory, this thesis explores the translation strategies of culture-loaded words of the famous Peking Opera fragments in Translation Series of a Hundred JingJu Classics, and make suggestions for revisions on its deficiencies. After research, the thesis finds that, firstly, the quality of the translation is higher when abiding by functional equivalence theory; secondly, for different types of culture-loaded words in Peking Opera, translators will adopt different translation strategies; thirdly, the commonly used translation methods of culture-loaded words in Peking Opera are as follows: free translation, amplification, annotation, omission and substitution, among which free translation and substitution are the most widely used.

KEYWORDS

Functional equivalence theory, culture-loaded words, Peking Opera Translation

CITE THIS PAPER

Manying Li, Study of the Translation Strategies for the Chinese Culture-loaded Words in Peking Opera under Functional Equivalence Theory. Advances in Broadcasting (2022) Vol. 2: 22-34. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.23977/abroa.2022.020103.

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